Workshop: Drystone Wall Building Various dates available, click the Book Now button to see more

Workshop: Drystone Wall Building

9:00 and 13:00
free
Adults only

This event is in the past. This page is for information purposes only.

Have you ever wanted to know how to build a drystone wall? Join one of our Workshop: Drystone Wall Building sessions to find out how!

Building with dry stone is one of the earliest skills developed by man, and it was used for building shelters, burial mounds, fortifications and animal enclosures. Dry stone walling is very durable because there is no mortar used that could crack and fail; the wall is held together merely by the weight of the stone and the skill of the builder. By the 1960s drystone wall building was dying-out as a fulltime occupation. To protect this heritage craft and to teach the next generation of builders, we've set up this skills-sharing initative!

At these sessions our trained volunteers and staff will guide you in how to select and shape stones, how to create a wall that stands by itself and how to safely handle stones and tools. You will then have time to put your skills to practice by building a stretch of wall in Great Linford Manor Park.

Saturday 21st August, 1-4pm.

Wednesday 29th September, 9am-12pm or 1-4pm.

Please note, we require you to be 18 years or over to take part in this activity. There is also lots of manual handling involved.

This activity is being supported by the National Lottery Heritage Fund as part of our restoration works for Great Linford Manor Park. For more information about our funded project, please visit our project webpage.

    • Great Linford Manor Park

      Facilities:

      Linford Manor Park park.jpg

      Great Linford Manor Park is a special, heritage-rich park set within the old village of Great Linford. It contains features that were first laid out centuries ago, including ponds and a Wilderness Garden which represent the English Landscape style of garden design that became popular for country estates during the 18th Century.

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